Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. Or good morning, if it’s the morning when you see this. Or hello, if it’s, well, anytime. Hello.
Uh, my name is Fitz, and it’s my pleasure to be being part of your tumblr experience today unless I wasn't who you were looking for. If—if I wasn't who you were looking for, then it’s that person's pleasure to be being it, and it’s my displeasure not to be. But at least I’m here, until you click away, so it’s a little bit me, as well, and I’m pleased about that.

miss-nerdgasmz:

neferipitou:

adds “we just caught our alternate universe selves making out and now everything is super awkward” to list of shipping tropes that need to be implemented everywhere

I’VE IMAGINED THIS SO MANY TIMES

taryndraws:

Uskerty has got to be one of my favourite episodes of Cabin Pressure.  Poor Martin. Also! I’ve got stickers and prints in my new Redbubble store.

taryndraws:

Uskerty has got to be one of my favourite episodes of Cabin Pressure.  Poor Martin. Also! I’ve got stickers and prints in my new Redbubble store.

“You fail only if you stop writing.”
- Ray Bradbury (via ilovereadingandwriting)
kierenwalkerpds:

monobeartheater:

absorr:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, CLICK HERE to follow Ultrafacts 

 Some of you are reblogging because you think its funny that programmers would talk to ducks. I’m reblogging because I think its funny picturing a programmer explaining their code, realizing what they did when they explain the bad code, then grabbing the strangling the duck while yelling “WHY WAS THE FIX THAT SIMPLE!? AM I GOING BLIND!”

AS A PROGRAMMER I CAN TELL YOU THAT THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT YOU FUCKING DO WE HAD TO BAN THE DUCKS FROM MY CLASSES BECAUSE EVERYONE WOULD FLIP THE DUCK OR THROW IT AT A WALL OR SOMETHING WHEN THEY FIGURED OUT THE PROBLEM IN THEIR CODE

so that’s the function of a rubber duck

kierenwalkerpds:

monobeartheater:

absorr:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, CLICK HERE to follow Ultrafacts

 Some of you are reblogging because you think its funny that programmers would talk to ducks. I’m reblogging because I think its funny picturing a programmer explaining their code, realizing what they did when they explain the bad code, then grabbing the strangling the duck while yelling “WHY WAS THE FIX THAT SIMPLE!? AM I GOING BLIND!”

AS A PROGRAMMER I CAN TELL YOU THAT THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT YOU FUCKING DO WE HAD TO BAN THE DUCKS FROM MY CLASSES BECAUSE EVERYONE WOULD FLIP THE DUCK OR THROW IT AT A WALL OR SOMETHING WHEN THEY FIGURED OUT THE PROBLEM IN THEIR CODE

so that’s the function of a rubber duck

whybenedict:

whos bright idea was this for me to cry over planes and its dysfunctional airline crew

Show me a prompt/kink meme and watch me slowly lose control of my life.

tracionn:




Cabin Pressure Character Labels [6 of 7], Snoopadoopinspired by (x)

tracionn:

Cabin Pressure Character Labels [6 of 7], Snoopadoop
inspired by (x)

Anonymous asked: What's your opinion on writing from multiple perspectives? Like, one chapter would be from Bob's POV, and then the next from Shirley's, ect. Do you have any tips for this?

clevergirlhelps:

I love multiple POV stories! I really like when authors explore multiple characters and really give the readers a chance to take in the story from many perspectives.

Multiple POV stories work best when:

  • You have many plots. The more complex the story, the more information you need to feed the reader for the story to work. Sometimes it’s just not possible to get all that information through a single protagonist. Many protagonists, however, are better suited to learning all that information. Many protagonists - especially if they aren’t working together - are also better at screwing up plans and creating chaos. 
  • The plot is character-based. A character-based plot means the story deals more with internal struggles than external struggles. If your plot is character based, you really want to show the reader what all the major characters are feeling. Again, a single protagonist probably isn’t privy to everyone’s emotions.

Tips:

  • Your POV characters don’t need equal time. And when I say equal time, I mean in chapter time or wordcount time. Devote time to the most important characters and most important situations. Do as the plot demands, not as the character demands.
  • Don’t double up scenes. One of my least favorite moments in multiple POV stories is when the author covers an event with one POV character, then goes back to the beginning of the event to cover it again with another character. If you want another character’s perspective, let them remember parts of the event or revisit as little of the even as you possibly can.
  • Work on voice. You want to keep those characters as distinct as possible. They are different people, after all. I have a voice tag here to get you started.
  • Divide the POVs. Not with that awful fanfiction.net **KATNISS’ POV** paragraph starter. Divide POVs by chapter or put a little divider thingy in between POVs if you’re switching in the middle of a chapter. 
  • Keep track of information. Your POV characters will not know the same things because they live different lives and will be exposed to different situations. If your POV character suddenly knows something they shouldn’t, you’ll have a plot hole.
  • Try to avoid one-shot POVs. One-shot POVs are when a character gets one POV chapter, then no others. There’s nothing wrong with it, but it feels strange to hear from a character once and then no other times. 
  • The plots should interact. Even if the POV characters never meet, their plots should have a common element: for example, a common struggle, a common character, or a common theme. This prevents the story from becoming a collection of badly patched short stories.  
John Finnemore @ EuroAirdotCon [x]
lakaeva asked: Do you know? I love Martin Crief's philosophy. I'm practicing karate (I'm new at it) but I'm slow (veery slow) at learning body movements and forms (I even suck at dancing ha...) but I like it a lot! I really enjoy it. I can do it, it's only that I need to practice much more than other people. That's why the words of Martin had a strong impact in me: even if I'm not good at it, I still can perfect it, no matter what. Hahaha, sorry, I was rereading some Cabin Pressure's quotes and got excited.

linguini17:

elvendorkinfinity:

thebritishteapot:

I always apply that quote to my art too. Martin is an inspiration for us all :’)

I’m so glad others see this tooIt’s so hard when you look around and think everyone else is Douglas and you’re MartinBut you’re MARTINLook at what he’s done!Look at how he didn’t give up despite every misstep or false start!Look at how he kept pushing through naysayers and failed tests and rubbish jobs!It takes a strong person to be MartinAnd it may be hardBut you can and will see it through to a more positive endWe all talk about how great his speech is at the end of Yverdon les BainsAnd even though it’s nondescriptMy favorite line is ‘I’m not finished yet.’Because as long as Martin’s not finishedAs long as youMeWe aren’t finishedThere’s alway a more positive end for us to reach forI love you Martin CrieffAnd it’s because I respect the WORLD of you

And just remember, too, that even if you do look around and everyone else is Douglas, Douglas is a thrice-divorced alcoholic who went from being Captain at one of the biggest airlines to being First Officer at a struggling charter firm, and who hardly ever sees is daughters.  Everyone struggles, even if you don’t see it.